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Anchorage International Airport
Anchorage International Airport
USA

Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport (IATA: ANC, ICAO: PANC, FAA LID: ANC)[2] is a major airport in the U.S. state of Alaska, located 4 nautical miles (7 km) southwest of downtown Anchorage.[1] The airport is named in honor of Ted Stevens, the U.S. Senator from Alaska serving from 1968 to 2009. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems, which categorized it as a primary commercial service airport.[3] Built in 1951 as Anchorage International Airport, the airport was served in the 1950s by Alaska Airlines,Northwest Orient, Pacific Northern Airlines and Reeve Aleutian Airways, using aircraft ranging from Douglas DC-3s to Boeing 377s,[4] and was also a refueling stop for Canadian Pacific Air Lines service to the Far East (one such aircraft being involved in a 1951 disappearance). From 1955 to 2011, the eastern end of the airport's southernmost runway connected to the Kulis Air National Guard Base, which was located on land leased by the airport.Anchorage was a common stopover for passengers flying to East Asia until the late 1980s because Chinese and Soviet airspace were off-limits and because the first generation of jets and widebody airliners did not have the range to fly non-stop across the Pacific Ocean. Carriers using Anchorage for this purpose included:
 Northwest Orient, the first airline to operate scheduled transpacific service after World War II, usedElmendorf Field[5] and later Anchorage International as a stopover for service between US points (Seattle, Chicago and Minneapolis at various times) and Tokyo as late as the mid-1970s.[6]
 Scandinavian Airlines (SAS) began a transpolar flight from Copenhagen to Tokyo via Anchorage in 1957.[7]
 Japan Airlines served Seattle through Anchorage in the early 1960s,[8] and offered service through Anchorage to London, Paris, Amsterdam, Düsseldorf and other European cities from the 1960s until as late as 1987.[9]
 Air France, British Airways, KLM, Lufthansa and Sabena all used Anchorage as a stopover point between Europe and Tokyo into the 1980s.[10]
 Korean Air used Anchorage as a stopover point for flights between Seoul and both Europe and the continental US in the 1980s.[11] On September 1, 1983, one of these flights, Korean Air Lines Flight 007was shot down by a Soviet pilot who had mistaken it for a spy plane, after unintentionally violating Soviet airspace.
Most scheduled passenger service from Anchorage to Europe and Asia ceased in the early 1990s following the end of the Cold War. Korean Air continued to serve Anchorage on a scheduled basis until the early 2000s. China Airlines, the last Asian carrier to serve Anchorage on a regular basis, used Anchorage as an intermediate stop on its Taipei-New York route until 2011, when it rerouted these flights to stop in Osaka. While a few charter passenger aircraft still stop at Anchorage on flights between Asia and the eastern United States, scheduled cargo carriers – which benefit from more volume and thus shorter route segments – continue to use Anchorage frequently.
In the 1990s, Alaska Airlines and Aeroflot operated service from Anchorage to several destinations in theRussian Far East, including Khabarovsk, Magadan, Petropavlovsk, Vladivostok and Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk.[12] Alaska Airlines pulled out of these markets in 1998 due to insufficient demand,[13] while the Aeroflot services were primarily intended as technical stops en route to Seattle and San Francisco and were cancelled once newer aircraft and nonstop rights became available. Reeve Aleutian Airways, Dalavia and MAVIAL Magadan Airlines also offered service between Anchorage and the Russian Far East at various times, catering to Kamchatka oil exploration and other niche markets.[14]
The airport was renamed in 2000 by the Alaska Legislature to honor then long-standing U.S. Senator Ted Stevens.[15]"Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia"

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